Appropriate Tool

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Description[edit | edit source]

Appropriate Tool refers the to manual tool which is best to destroy a specific type of block. Each block has a different base material which determines the appropriate tool for it. Using a non Appropriate Tool reduces the damage inflicted to about 20%, making it extremely inefficient when compared to using the Appropriate Tool.

Tool Assignment[edit | edit source]

Currently there are six different base types for blocks but only three of them have been assigned an Appropriate Tool:

  • Stone - Pickaxe
  • Earth - Shovel
  • Wood - Fireaxe
  • Glass - no specific Appropriate Tool assigned
  • Metal - no specific Appropriate Tool assigned
  • Fabric - no specific Appropriate Tool assigned

For metal there is no Appropriate Tool which does 100% damage, but the Pickaxe inflicts 62.5% of its damage value to metal based blocks. (about 62.5% of the actual damage - 1.25 instead of 2.0 at 100% Durability) .This makes the Pickaxe the most efficient tool for breaking metal based blocks.

For Glass there no Appropriate Tool either, however, it can usually be destroyed by one hit with the fist and therefore any tool can be used to break it.

For fabric the appropriate tool is unknown.

Block damage[edit | edit source]

Each tool has its own block damage value, the figures shown below represent the block damage achieved with a tool at full durability when used on a block with the correct type of base material.

  • Pickaxe has a block damage of 2, unless used on metal based blocks where it has a value of 1.25
  • Shovel has a block damage of 1.
  • Fireaxe has a block damage of 1.

Calculations[edit | edit source]

Appropriate Tool value and Hardness is the base data used for calculating the Durability of blocks. Using this information one may calculate the Durability for different blocks instead of measuring it.

  x = Hardness ÷ Block Damage (Appropriate Tool)
If x = Integer
Then Durability = x + 1
Else Durability = RoundUp(x)
In words:
Divide Hardness by the Block Damage of the Appropriate Tool
Add one to the total if the result is a whole number
If the total is not a whole number round the result up to the next whole number.

See also[edit | edit source]